project review

Family of Volunteers

Review submitted by The Costa Rica Team
Review date 4 Jul 2018

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Having now completed 4 weeks in the jungle the group feels more like a family than volunteers.

Since our time on here the wildlife has been plentiful. We have been lucky (or unlucky!) enough to see the fer de lance snake and on our last night at our Cerra Osa camp we even had a coral snake pay us a visit!

Last week we were busy building our new camp, ready to move this week. This was extremely hard work, very intense, but also a great team building experience and extremely rewarding for the entire group.

On our first day in camp we had a troop of white faced capuchin monkeys around camp, so I think we picked a good site!

The food in camp is, as always, interesting! It’s amazing what variety of meals can be made with rice and beans. During the time we were building our new camp, we were lucky enough to sample some of the local worker, Regulo’s, empejatas. They are bread with cheese and sugar inside, sounds odd but tastes good!

We’ve been doing more bird surveys, frog plots and mammal transects around the camp move and we’re currently thinking about projects for our BTECs so the variety of conservation work will expand over the next few weeks. As we’re closer to the beach at our new site (you can see the ocean through the forest, 5 mins walk to the beach!) we’ll also be doing more mammal transects on the beach, there are plenty of tracks to be found there, and bird surveys too. Every time we’re on the beach we see large flocks of pelicans flying along the shoreline just above the waves, amazing to see!

When we have free time most of us tend to take the local collectivo into town, it takes about an hour and a half, but means we can stock up on supplies and also interact with local people. Everyone in Puerto Jimenez so far have been extremely welcoming and provide a bit of variety to our daily life on camp!

Nicoletta, Maiki, James, Sian, Mark, Emil, and Rachael

Find out more about the Costa Rica Big Cats, Primates and Turtle Conservation project